Category Archives: Commentary

Social justice: is it really justice?

social justiceSocial justice is a term that has been a part of American politics since the mid 1960s. Unfortunately, there is no national understanding on exactly what this term means. As an American historian that has spent considerable time studying the history of the early republic, there was a strong desire to create a nation founded on the concept of equality under the law. Men such as Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and James Madison had grown up in a society where one’s social status was dictated by birth. Each of those men, held high in regard by the American colonials, were, in the eyes of the English elite, commoners without any claim to the benefits of nobility.

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America: new trends in the college classroom

hcc (Small)August always brings about an opportunity for me to study the new trends of the younger generation. It marks the beginning of a new academic year and for many young people, the change to reinvent themselves as they enter what they consider the adult world. Over the past seven years I have seen several trends that made me question the future of our nation. This semester I began to notice something new – two distinct sets of new trends that should make Americans become more serious about what we are teaching the younger generation of Americans.

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The Rise of American Fascism

52222747_fascism_xlargeWithin our nation we have witnesses the emergence of American fascism. It is prevalent within American politics, the mainstream media, and even within formal education. What was once considered every American’s right to debate and disagree with the government, social trends, and even just each other is no longer remotely considered as a natural right. All it takes is a study of America’s founding to understand how important this was  considered. Throughout America’s history, one of the constant features of the American people is a history of disagreement, dissention, and discussion about the differing opinions – also commonly referred to as the natural right to exercise individual freedom of conscience.