Americanism: a concept to be valued

americanismIt has been nearly two full months since the last time I shared my musings about the state of our nation. It has not been because of a shortage of topics but rather of feeling a bit overwhelmed at the sheer volume of things to discuss. As we enter the campaign season of the 2016 election, there are so many more issues that warrant discussion, such as the marginalization of the right-of-center American, the near criminalization of those who reject man-made global warming, cooling, climate change, climate disruption, the shaming and near-criminalization of those who hold a more traditional view of marriage, and the defense of national sovereignty. At the end of the spring 2015 semester, I also decided to spend some time reading the writings of the men who influenced those who fought the American revolution and would later write the Constitution of the United States – this has simply added even more topics to the already long list.

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The need for educational reform

educational reformFor nearly twelve years I have been openly discussing the need for educational reform in our public schools and within higher education. Each semester it seems more and more college students are enrolled in remedial and developmental courses that will not transfer to other colleges and do not count towards the degree’s requirements for graduation. Students who take these courses must either pay out-of-pocket or with their federal and state financial aid.  Almost all of these students that take the remedial courses have one thing in common – they hold a high school diploma from a public high school.

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The Rise of American Fascism

52222747_fascism_xlargeWithin our nation we have witnesses the emergence of American fascism. It is prevalent within American politics, the mainstream media, and even within formal education. What was once considered every American’s right to debate and disagree with the government, social trends, and even just each other is no longer remotely considered as a natural right. All it takes is a study of America’s founding to understand how important this was  considered. Throughout America’s history, one of the constant features of the American people is a history of disagreement, dissention, and discussion about the differing opinions – also commonly referred to as the natural right to exercise individual freedom of conscience.